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Maths Week 2011

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Maths Week 2011

MATHSWEEK 2011 is 8th - 12th August

August 2011 - NZAMT News Flash

MATHS WEEK - Is a FREE set of resources, activities and games for teachers, students, and parents to help promote Mathematics.  The activities can be done at school or at home. Activities are interactive or can be downloaded and photocopied for use in class without a need for internet access.  Aligned to the New Zealand Curriculum, a range of activities are available at each Curriculum Level from 1 through 5.  Parents and students can register themselves or teachers can register an entire class. Prizes are available through separate auctions at different year levels. The attached document gives more detailed information on available activities.

Registrations now open at http://www.mathsweek.org.nz/

{xtypo_download}Download Maths Week Detailed Information{/xtypo_download}

 

Dear Teacher,

• The aims of Maths Week are to keep students interested in mathematics and to give teachers resources which they can use in the classroom. The resources are written to give extra emphasis on the joys of mathematics and where it is used in our society. It compliments and updates mathematics textbooks and gives teachers resources which require research which may not be readily available to them.

• Maths Week resources are available to teachers, parents and students via the www.mathsweek.org.nz web-site from Monday August 8th to August 14th.

• Hard copy for teachers Is available in PDF in the week before Maths Week this year. This includes the answers to all except the Millionaire Challenges.

• ‘Trade Me’ type auctions for prizes using Maths Week Dollars will take place for students during Maths Week. Over five hundred dollars worth of prizes are available in the auctions.

• This year the auctions will be run for students of each Year group.

There will be five different sets of auctions. Each will have their own prize lists.

• Last year there were over 68 318 students and teachers who registered on the site. This year registration is much easier and will be a requirement of all who want to use the Maths Week site.

• Maths Week is for all mathematics students from Year 1 to Year 11.

The Challengers for Maths Week this year are

Daily Dollar Questions.

The Year 1 topics are

Counting cannon balls Adding pirate numbers Shapes of cartoon faces

Patterns of numbers Estimating from people pictures.

 

The Year 2 topics are

Counting potatoes Multiplying chocolate squares Dice numbers

Road sign shapes Navigating through a village.

 

Level 3 topics are

number calculations country shapes reading tables

every number is special! Who is this mathematician?

 

Level 4 topics are

number calculations Rugby World Cup problems family trees

reading sports tables three dimension shapes

 

Level 5 topics are

number calculations Rugby World Cup problems family trees

reading sports tables three dimension shapes

 

Maths Millionaire.

This section has been very popular in the past two years. It is modelled on the very popular T.V. programme, except the questions are mathematical or have some connection with maths.

This year there are again three “Maths Millionaires” for each day of the week.

One set is for Senior Students, one set is for Junior Students and one set is for Families.

 

On two days of Maths Millionaire there are themes.

• Senior Maths Millionaire on the Thursday has the theme of “Lewis Carroll puzzles”.

Senior Maths Millionaire on Friday has the theme of “facebook” questions.

 

• Junior Maths Millionaire on Thursday the theme is “sports” questions – 10 sports!

Junior Maths Millionaire on Friday the theme is “mystery numbers” – clues given.

 

• Family Maths Millionaire contain questions on particular topics each day – car logos, product logos, nursery rhymes, maths places around the world, who was he/she? questions, old math questions, movie and song questions …

 

The Amazing Maths Races.

This section is very popular with all students. Again this year there are five new “races”. This section is an attempt to relate maths with the world outside the classroom.

 

• The first “race” is about travelling from Wellington to Christchurch by ferry and train.

• “Race” two is about the places Captain Cook named when he sailed and mapped around the coast of New Zealand in 1769.

• The next “race” is unusual in that it follows the possible path of the New Zealand All Blacks in this years Rugby World Cup. It does not require a knowledge of rugby football to progress in this “race” although it will create a lot of interest before the big event. It does show how difficult it will be for the All Blacks to win the cup!

• The fourth “race” is about mystery numbers. The clues are given and the students have to find the numbers!

• “Race” five is another travel trip. This time it follows two young students flying around the world. Their trip of a lifetime starts off in Nelson and the questions relate to the aircraft they travel on. The aircraft model numbers give the maths answers for the trip.

The Survivor Series.

This gives Teachers the popular classroom resource it has been for several years. It is written for Teachers to use in class and can expand if they wish into much larger activities.

• Level 1 is written by Mrs Kate Simmonds, Teacher, Waimari School, Christchurch.

The theme is “Farmyard friends”.

The tasks involve counting, adding and subtracting, skip counting in 2’s, geometry, halves.

 

• Level 2 is written by Mrs Tamara Jones, Teacher, The Gardens School, Auckland.

The theme is “In the number jungle”.

The tasks involve addition and subtraction, skip counting, multiplying, geometry, converting mm to m, place value, halves.

 

• Level 3.

Networks and paths. Tracing paths leading to Eulers formula.

Snakes and Ladders. The maths of one of the worlds most popular game.

Spiralmania. Drawing spirals according to mathematical sequences.

Tangrams. Constructing and solving puzzles.

Animal speeds. Comparing speeds and distances animals travel at.

 

• Level 4.

Organising the Rugby World Cup draw. Quite mathematical!

Making a Maze. Constructing and planning rectangular mazes.

Where were they born? Famous maths people.

Networks and paths. Using Eulers formula and solving network problems.

Estimating. Making estimations from photographs.

 

• Level 5.

Rugby World Cup. Organising and planning the draw.

Making a Maze. At a higher level than Level 4.

Flatland Mathematics in a land of two dimensions.

Poem Codes. Used by NZ’er Nancy Wake to code messages in 1943-1945.

Math problems. Tricky rate problems.

It is up to Teachers to choose which Level or Levels students work at they work in their classes. The aim is that all students should be able to do and enjoy the Survivor Series.

It is possible and Teachers are encouraged to have different Levels being worked at by students in the same class.

 

Mathex.

This year the questions are from the Mathswell Competition from Wellington and the Mathex competition from the Manawatu. The questions are of a standard to enthuse students in the very popular team competitions which take place during the school year. This will give great practice for teams!

 

Te Reo Maori.

This year the 2010 Daily Dollar Questions in all Levels are available in Te Reo. These were written into Te Reo by Mr Brian Tweed from Massey University.

They have been done outstandingly well and are a real asset to Maths Week.

Students can do either Daily Dollar or Daily Dollar Te Reo to gain Maths Week Dollars for the auctions. They cannot do both to gain the Maths Week Dollars.

 

Games

The games section has had a face-lift and looks fresh to attract the hordes of players it does. The points students gain here are recorded onto leader-boards for each game and at the end of the week several prizes are awarded to the top players in each game.

This year the games are

Raining Money, Canyon Splatter,

Savings Game, Balancing Act,

Rotate Translate, Square Bricks,

Jigsaw, Ordering,

Algebra Rules.

Some of the games are like arcade games but some are very much harder and need thinking to solve them. All have a mathematical flavour and are worth doing in class.

Students of all Years will be able to do the games.

It is worth spending a period letting the class work the games.

 

Family Maths.

The family Maths Millionaire is written with the whole family in mind – including grand-parents, parents, little brothers and sisters! The questions create a lot of fun. It is mathematical – sort of!

Some of the questions require discussion and many require grand-parents advice!!

This has been a very popular section of Maths Week in the last three years.

 

Famous Mazes.

This year the maze section has been revamped and modernised. The catch name now is Maze Craze! There are ten mazes. Seven of them are actual mazes around the world.

The headings are

• “Maze Craze in New Zealand”, “Maze Craze in England”,

• “Maze Craze in France”, “Maze Craze in the USA”,

• “Maze Craze in Mouseland”, “Maze Craze in Squiglyland”, and

• “Maze Craze going to School”.

This gives an indication of the urgency and modernisation that has gone through this section. This should appeal to students. The mazes are easy for Teachers to copy for their classes.

Conclusion.

The aim of Maths Week is to help Teachers to give Mathematics an identity within their school.

The maths should be attractive, useful, practical, interesting and fun.

Much effort has been made to relate the maths here to the practical world of the students.

 

We hope that Teachers will enjoy Maths Week this year as much as their students do and that they all find it worthwhile.

Jennifer Hudson, Bill Ellwood,

President N.Z.A.M.T. Writer and coordinator Maths Wee

Dear Teacher,

  • The aims of Maths Week are to keep students interested in mathematics and to give teachers resources which they can use in the classroom. The resources are written to give extra emphasis on the joys of mathematics and where it is used in our society. It compliments and updates mathematics textbooks and gives teachers resources which require research which may not be readily available to them.

  • Maths Week resources are available to teachers, parents and students via the www.mathsweek.org.nz web-site from Monday August 8th to August 14th.

  • Hard copy for teachers Is available in PDF in the week before Maths Week this year. This includes the answers to all except the Millionaire Challenges.

  • ‘Trade Me’ type auctions for prizes using Maths Week Dollars will take place for students during Maths Week. Over five hundred dollars worth of prizes are available in the auctions.

  • This year the auctions will be run for students of each Year group.

There will be five different sets of auctions. Each will have their own prize lists.

  • Last year there were over 68 318 students and teachers who registered on the site. This year registration is much easier and will be a requirement of all who want to use the Maths Week site.

  • Maths Week is for all mathematics students from Year 1 to Year 11.

The Challengers for Maths Week this year are

Daily Dollar Questions.

The Year 1 topics are

Counting cannon balls Adding pirate numbers Shapes of cartoon faces

Patterns of numbers Estimating from people pictures.

The Year 2 topics are

Counting potatoes Multiplying chocolate squares Dice numbers

Road sign shapes Navigating through a village.

Level 3 topics are

number calculations country shapes reading tables

every number is special! Who is this mathematician?

Level 4 topics are

number calculations Rugby World Cup problems family trees

reading sports tables three dimension shapes

Level 5 topics are

number calculations Rugby World Cup problems family trees

reading sports tables three dimension shapes

Maths Millionaire.

This section has been very popular in the past two years. It is modelled on the very popular T.V. programme, except the questions are mathematical or have some connection with maths.

This year there are again three “Maths Millionaires” for each day of the week.

One set is for Senior Students, one set is for Junior Students and one set is for Families.

On two days of Maths Millionaire there are themes.

  • Senior Maths Millionaire on the Thursday has the theme of “Lewis Carroll puzzles”.

Senior Maths Millionaire on Friday has the theme of “facebook” questions.

  • Junior Maths Millionaire on Thursday the theme is “sports” questions – 10 sports!

Junior Maths Millionaire on Friday the theme is “mystery numbers” – clues given.

  • Family Maths Millionaire contain questions on particular topics each day – car logos, product logos, nursery rhymes, maths places around the world, who was he/she? questions, old math questions, movie and song questions …

The Amazing Maths Races.

This section is very popular with all students. Again this year there are five new “races”. This section is an attempt to relate maths with the world outside the classroom.

  • The first “race” is about travelling from Wellington to Christchurch by ferry and train.

  • “Race” two is about the places Captain Cook named when he sailed and mapped around the coast of New Zealand in 1769.

  • The next “race” is unusual in that it follows the possible path of the New Zealand All Blacks in this years Rugby World Cup. It does not require a knowledge of rugby football to progress in this “race” although it will create a lot of interest before the big event. It does show how difficult it will be for the All Blacks to win the cup!

  • The fourth “race” is about mystery numbers. The clues are given and the students have to find the numbers!

  • “Race” five is another travel trip. This time it follows two young students flying around the world. Their trip of a lifetime starts off in Nelson and the questions relate to the aircraft they travel on. The aircraft model numbers give the maths answers for the trip.

The Survivor Series.

This gives Teachers the popular classroom resource it has been for several years. It is written for Teachers to use in class and can expand if they wish into much larger activities.

  • Level 1 is written by Mrs Kate Simmonds, Teacher, Waimari School, Christchurch.

The theme is “Farmyard friends”.

The tasks involve counting, adding and subtracting, skip counting in 2’s, geometry, halves.

  • Level 2 is written by Mrs Tamara Jones, Teacher, The Gardens School, Auckland.

The theme is “In the number jungle”.

The tasks involve addition and subtraction, skip counting, multiplying, geometry, converting mm to m, place value, halves.

  • Level 3.

Networks and paths. Tracing paths leading to Eulers formula.

Snakes and Ladders. The maths of one of the worlds most popular game.

Spiralmania. Drawing spirals according to mathematical sequences.

Tangrams. Constructing and solving puzzles.

Animal speeds. Comparing speeds and distances animals travel at.

  • Level 4.

Organising the Rugby World Cup draw. Quite mathematical!

Making a Maze. Constructing and planning rectangular mazes.

Where were they born? Famous maths people.

Networks and paths. Using Eulers formula and solving network problems.

Estimating. Making estimations from photographs.

  • Level 5.

Rugby World Cup. Organising and planning the draw.

Making a Maze. At a higher level than Level 4.

Flatland Mathematics in a land of two dimensions.

Poem Codes. Used by NZ’er Nancy Wake to code messages in 1943-1945.

Math problems. Tricky rate problems.

It is up to Teachers to choose which Level or Levels students work at they work in their classes. The aim is that all students should be able to do and enjoy the Survivor Series.

It is possible and Teachers are encouraged to have different Levels being worked at by students in the same class.

Mathex.

This year the questions are from the Mathswell Competition from Wellington and the Mathex competition from the Manawatu. The questions are of a standard to enthuse students in the very popular team competitions which take place during the school year. This will give great practice for teams!

Te Reo Maori.

This year the 2010 Daily Dollar Questions in all Levels are available in Te Reo. These were written into Te Reo by Mr Brian Tweed from Massey University.

They have been done outstandingly well and are a real asset to Maths Week.

Students can do either Daily Dollar or Daily Dollar Te Reo to gain Maths Week Dollars for the auctions. They cannot do both to gain the Maths Week Dollars.

Games

The games section has had a face-lift and looks fresh to attract the hordes of players it does. The points students gain here are recorded onto leader-boards for each game and at the end of the week several prizes are awarded to the top players in each game.

This year the games are

Raining Money, Canyon Splatter,

Savings Game, Balancing Act,

Rotate Translate, Square Bricks,

Jigsaw, Ordering,

Algebra Rules.

Some of the games are like arcade games but some are very much harder and need thinking to solve them. All have a mathematical flavour and are worth doing in class.

Students of all Years will be able to do the games.

It is worth spending a period letting the class work the games.

Family Maths.

The family Maths Millionaire is written with the whole family in mind – including grand-parents, parents, little brothers and sisters! The questions create a lot of fun. It is mathematical – sort of!

Some of the questions require discussion and many require grand-parents advice!!

This has been a very popular section of Maths Week in the last three years.

Famous Mazes.

This year the maze section has been revamped and modernised. The catch name now is Maze Craze! There are ten mazes. Seven of them are actual mazes around the world.

The headings are

  • “Maze Craze in New Zealand”, “Maze Craze in England”,
  • “Maze Craze in France”, “Maze Craze in the USA”,
  • “Maze Craze in Mouseland”, “Maze Craze in Squiglyland”, and
  • “Maze Craze going to School”.

This gives an indication of the urgency and modernisation that has gone through this section. This should appeal to students. The mazes are easy for Teachers to copy for their classes.

Conclusion.

The aim of Maths Week is to help Teachers to give Mathematics an identity within their school.

The maths should be attractive, useful, practical, interesting and fun.

Much effort has been made to relate the maths here to the practical world of the students.

We hope that Teachers will enjoy Maths Week this year as much as their students do and that they all find it worthwhile.

Jennifer Hudson, Bill Ellwood,

President N.Z.A.M.T. Writer and coordinator Maths Week.

 

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